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Steven Galipeau

Jungian Analyst -- Author -- Lecturer

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Teaching and Lecturing
One of my passions and interests is doing public programs for various groups.  I've given frequent lectures and workshops over the years on the local level at the C. G. Jung Institute of Los Angeles as well as at Jungian Analyst Conferences in both Northern and Southern California.  I've also spoken at Jungian Conferences on the National and International level.
Various Jung groups such as the Orange County Jung Club and the Friends of Jung in San Diego have invited me to speak, as well as the Phoenix Friends of Jung and the Jung group in Sante Fe, New Mexico.
Below are descriptions of lectures and workshops I will be offering or have offered in the past.
2018
Jung’s Typology

Date: Saturday, November 3, 2018,  10 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Location: C. G. Jung Institute of Los Angeles

Jung's interest and evaluation of human typology first emerged during his association with Freud and developed further through his profound inner experiences as reported in The Red Book.  His first major work after this time in his life was Psychological Types. We will examine the development of Jung’s theory of typology throughout Jung's life and later by several Jungians. We will explore clinical application of psychological types as well as the cultural implications of typology in our current age.

This presentation will be the first of a year long Certificate Program in Jungian Studies.  Each month from September to June features an offering concerning Jungian theory and practice by other analysts at the Los Angeles Institute.

This presentation will also be offered on November 17, 2018 at the Studio School on Bixel St. in downtown Los Angeles.

Psyche and Film: Wonder Woman
Time: Friday, February 16, 2018, 7:30-9:30 p.m.
Location: C. G. Jung Institute of Los Angeles
 

Film gives us a unique way to experience and reflect on the psyche. This presentation will begin with a discussion of the importance of film as a modern art form, and then explore some of the specifics of the recent Wonder Woman film.  Special attention will be given to the Amazon/Artemis archetype.


Terrorism and the Soul
Time: Sunday March 18, 2018, 4:00-6:00 p.m.
Location: C. G.Jung Club of Orange County
See below for description
Taught in 2017

Jung's Typology: The Inferior Function

Time: Friday, February 24, 2017 7:30-9:30 p.m.


Location: C. G. Jung Institute of Los Angeles

Returning to the early years of Jung's reflections about typology and the basic structure of his theory, we will examine the two attitudes of extraversion and introversion, and the four functions of sensation/intuition and feeling/thinking.  Jung recognized that each of us has a superior function and an inferior function, and this reality was an important part of his book Psychological Types.  We will explore the inferior function issues so important to Jung as a product of cultural developments which reward only what we do well, but not the whole person.  Attention will be given to both the personal and cultural issues that concern the inferior function.


Taught in 2016
 

Is the Force Still With Us?

Date: Wednesday, June 8, 2016

Location: C. G. Jung Institute of Los Angeles

 

The arrival of the new Star Wars film, "Episode VIII: The Force Awakens" has stirred an enormous anticipation.  "Star Wars" has been with us since 1977 and the interest has not waned.  Jung has written that the best we can do is dream the myth forward.  This presentation will explore the newest film in light of the original trilogy and my reflections on this trilogy in my book The Journey of Luke Skywalker: An Analysis of Modern Myth and Symbol.  To what extent does the newest Star Wars film keep this mythic adventure alive.

Terrorism and the Soul 
Date: Wednesday, March 30, 2016
 

International events, like the shootings in Paris, as well as national violent eruptions on college campuses and other locations challenge us at our core to live in a soulful way.  This lecture will explore the works of C. G. Jung, Edward Edinger, and Karen Armstrong as they may help us understand how splits in the modern psyche open the door for such events to erupt, and the challenges we all face in living with these horrific realities.

Taught in 2015

Jung’s Typology

Date: Saturday, September 12, 2015

Location: C. G. Jung Institute of Los Angeles

 

Jung's interest and evaluation of human typology first emerged during his association with Freud and developed further through his profound inner experiences as reported in The Red Book.  His first major work after this time in his life was Psychological Types. We will examine the development of Jung’s theory of typology throughout Jung's life and later by several Jungians. We will explore clinical application of psychological types as well as the cultural implications of typology in our current age.

 

This presentation will be the first of a year long Certificate Program in Jungian Studies.  Each month from September to June features an offering concerning Jungian theory and practice by other analysts at the Los Angeles Institute.

Jungian Perspectives on Clinical Supervision
Date: Saturday, March 28, 2015
 
Moderator of seminar featuring four other Jungian analysts speaking to the issues of supervision in Jungian practice.
 
The seminar was designed to facilitate a discussion of the role of supervision in analytical psychology and in particular the role of supervision in the training of Jungian analysts.  We used selections from the collection of essays found in Jungian Perspectives on Clinical Supervision edited by Paul Kugler as a starting point.  Robin Wynslow, Deborah Howell, Claire Allphin from San Francisco, and Cydny Rothe lead discussions based on published papers on a variety of themes related to clinical supervision.
 
Lectures in 2014
Culture and Psyche: The Feeling Function
Date: Saturday, November 15, 2014

As Jung developed his theory of psychological types he saw not only individual components, but collective components of typology.  In particular he noted that the accelerated growth of Western culture was causing a significant split in the psyche of individuals, as well as estrangement between cultures with different value systems.  Jung recognized that a byproduct of the accelerated development of Western culture is that each of us has a superior function and an inferior function.  Assessments using tools such as the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator would indicate that the inferior function of our extraverted thinking/sensation culture is feeling.   We will look at the issue of the feeling function as the inferior function of our culture building on insights from Jung and explore places where the feeling function is trying to emerge to offset our typological cultural imbalance.

The Wolf: An Ecological Case Study in Demonic Projection

Date: Wednesday, July 9, 2014; 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.
 

No animal reflects our conflict with our own unconscious internal world and our disavowal of our own shadow more profoundly than the wolf. Wolves have borne the burden of an intense hatred and misunderstanding that has brought their population to near extinction. In this presentation we will review our history with the wolf, our psychological relationship to this noble creature of the wild, and examine several wolf dreams (including one reported by Jung and one by Freud) to help us differentiate aspects of our inner wolf from the wolf that lives in the wild and our projections onto it.

Jung's Typology: The Feeling Function

Date: Saturday, April 5, 2014, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Location:C. G. Jung Institute of Los Angeles

 

Jung's early reflections about typology led to his model of two attitudes: extraversion and introversion, and the four functions of consciousness: sensation, intuition, thinking, and feeling.  He recognized that each of us has a superior function and an inferior function, and that his own inferior function was feeling.  The issue of the inferior function, so important to Jung, will be explored with special attention to the feeling function, an all-important and often neglected aspect of the psyche.  Further developments made by various Jungians concerning the understanding and development of this all-important function will also be considered.

 

The Wolf: An Ecological Case Study in Demonic Projection

Date: Sunday, February 16, 2014; 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.

See above for the full lecture description.

Other Previous Lectures 

 
Our Projective Dance with the Wolf
Dates: November 2-4, 2012
Location: Portland, Oregon
Event: 23rd Annual International Forum for Psychoanalytic Education Interdisciplinary Conference IFPE
 
An earlier version of my wolf material was presented at this Conference as well as at a Conference of Jungian Analysts in Pasadena, CA in March, 2012.
 
The Red Book and Jung's Typology
Date: Lecture presented September 14, 2012

 

During his relationship with Freud Jung began formulating his ideas concerning psychological types.  His break with Freud was followed by an intense period of introversion, much of which we can now find expressed in word and image in The Red Book.   Jung’s first major publication following this deeply internal journey in his life was Psychological Types (now Volume 6 of the Collected Works).  Steve will be examining some of the figures and dialogues that Jung describes in The Red Book that are closely related to his later work in typology.  He will connect key passages in The Red Book to critical passages in Psychological Types to explore what Jung believed were the most important personal and collective issues to be addressed in considering typology.

 

Developments and Amplifications of Jung's Work in Typology

Date: September 15, 2012 Workshop

Location: Phoenix Friends of Jung

 

Steve will set the stage by returning to the early years of Jung's reflections about typology including his correspondence with Hans Schmid (soon to be published).  Jung, for instance, began to wonder why only one member of a family would be negatively impacted by the family psychology.  Steve will also summarize the typology Jung outlines in Psychological Types.

 

With a review of the principles of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator based on Jung’s theories of typology Steve will help us to understand our development and the awareness of the secondary function. He will also review the work of Jungian Analyst John Giannini who works to link the couplings of the Myers-Briggs to a variety of archetypal models of the personality, in particular those of Toni Wolff (archetypes of the feminine) and Robert Moore and Richard Gillette (archetypes of the masculine). Giannini has also found parallels to Jung’s typology in such diverse fields as developmental psychology, brain research, and theories of organization development.

 

Steve will also review Jungian Analyst John Beebe’s work with typology and the archetypal considerations he uses in understanding the superior function through the secondary and tertiary functions, to the inferior function.

Experiencing Jung: Jung’s Typology

Date: Wednesday, March 28, 2012

Location: C. G. Jung Institute of Los Angeles During the time of his relationship with Freud and others like Hans Schmid Jung began formulating his ideas concerning psychological types.For instance, why would only one member of a family be negatively impacted by the family psychology?After a period of intense introspection following his break with Freud, Jung’s creative work in this area resulted in the publication of Psychological Types, now Volume 6 of the Collected Works.We will examine aspects of Jung’s personal experience of typology as reflected in The Red Book, selected passages from Psychological Types, and review the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator as it relates to Jung’s psychology. The work of Jungian Analysts John Giannini and John Beebe will also be introduced so that we may gain an overview of the far ranging significance of Jung’s typology.

 

Harry Potter, Horcruxes, and the Deathly Hallows

Date: February 8, 2012

Location: C. G. Jung Institute of Los Angeles

 

Beginning with a look at Jung’s consideration of magic in The Red Book, this presentation will explore some of the key symbolism of the conclusion of the Harry Potter series, in particular the Horcuxes and the tale of the Deathly Hallows.  We also look at the development of key characters, their successes and failures, as reflecting some of the vicissitudes of the individuation process and finding the proper relationship to the unconscious “magical” realm.

 

Offered in Fall 2011

 

Coming Home: War and the Soul

A Jungian Perspective on PTSD

 

Date: Saturday, November 12, 2011

Location: C. G. Jung Institute of Los Angeles

 

In this workshop held the day after Veterans Day, we began by looking at some of C. G. Jung’s visions prior to the outbreak of World War I as images of the nature of war from the viewpoint of the psyche.  We then looked at samples of post war dreams and nightmares and dreams of soldiers while in combat.  We also reviewed of the work of people who have worked extensively with veterans including Edward Tick and Jonathan Shay, including Shay's insights into the profound psychology of the Iliad and the Odyssey as related to the veteran experience in war and coming home.  We examined myth, fairytale, and film as imaginative ways the soul uses to come to grip with the reality of war. We reflected on the collective burden of war and how each of us carries certain responsibilities so that the weight does not fall just on those sent to the battlefields. We discussed how even today we are still “recovering” from our various wars dating back to the civil war, which began 150 years ago, because of the enormous psychological impact of what happens to both the individual and collective psyche.

 

Other Previous Lectures
  
The Red Book and Jung's Typology
Date: Given on Wednesday, January 19, 2011
 
Description: Beginning with his relationship with Freud Jung began formulating his ideas concerning psychological types.  For instance, why would only one member of a family be negatively impacted by the family psychology?  After his intense period of introversion following his break with Freud, which we can now find expressed in word and image in The Red Book, Jung’s first major publication was Psychological Types, now Volume 6 of the Collected Works.  We will examine Jung’s theory of typology in relationship to some of the figures and dialogues that Jung describes in The Red Book and explore how they have informed his understanding of psychological opposites and the approached he used in outlining his type theory in Psychological Types.
 
Psyche and Nature: The Call of the Wild
Date: Given on Wednesday, November 3, 2010
 
Description:In a letter towards the end of his life Jung wrote, “True to my nature-loving bias, I have followed the call of the wild, the age-old trail through secluded wildernesses where a primitive human community may be found.” This presentation explored the relationship between psyche and nature through the lens of Jung’s life journey, one that shows how deeply connected these aspects of life are.  It then explored the unique journey of Englishman Archie Belaney, who immigrated to Canada in the early 20th century during the time Jung lived, and eventually took on the half Native American alter ego of Grey Owl and became a leading environmental writer and speaker.  I reviewed Grey Owl’s life and his efforts to save the beaver from extinction and extended this theme to the wolf, examining both animals role, as they sit on the brink of extinction, in helping maintain a balanced ecosystem, . (This presentation was an expanded version of a paper presented in August in Canada.)
 
Wilderness in North America: The Call of the Wild
Original paper presented at the XVIII Congress of the International Association for Analytical Psychology on August 23, 2010 in Montreal.
 
 
Avatar: The Journey on Pandora

Given on Wednesday, June 16, 2010 at the C. G. Jung Institute of Los Angeles

 

Description:  Jung wrote, “The most we can do is to dream the myth onward and give it a modern dress.”  One of the ways this happens in our culture is through certain evocative films.  Avatar is such a film, and after examining a few of its themes that are also found in earlier films, we will explore some new elements in the symbolism of Avatar.  We will descend into the dreamlike quality of the planet Pandora in order to investigate key psychological dilemmas posed by an encounter with the unconscious.  We will pay special attention to the anima archetype and how the call to individuation brings a person to a more complete psychological state, one that challenges us to fully navigate the “compass” of the soul.

 

Dreams-God’s Forgotten Language

Given on Wednesday, January 20, 2010

 

Description: Jung’s approach to dreams is unique in the way it carries forward the approach of ancient religious traditions to dreams.  For instance Jung noted that the healers he met in Africa made the same distinction he did between “big” dreams and personal ones.  Jungians have noted the connection between Jung’s approach and that of the temples of the Greek god Asclepius.  In this presentation, I explored key Biblical figures and the place of dreams and their meaning in the Hebrew Bible, in particular Joseph and Jacob from the Book of Genesis.  I also reviewed the importance of dreams found in the first two chapters of Matthew’s Gospel.

 

In the Spring 2010 I taught a class on Dream Interpretation to Candidates in the Analysts Training Program at the C. G. Jung Institute of Los Angeles.

 

Gnosticism:Mary Magdalene -- The Missing Feminine

Given on Wednesday,November 4, 2009

 

Description: The success of The DaVinci Code affirms an unconscious yearning in our culture for the long forgotten sacred feminine.  During this lecture I discussed the success of Dan Brown’s novel in the light of Jung’s psychology and in particular Jung's own interest in gnosticism and his discovery of the lost feminine.  Special attention was paid to the Gnostic Gospel of Mary Magdalene and how its discovery reflects the internal process of rediscovering the neglected feminine in the souls of women and men today.

  

Spring 2009
 
In April I lectured on the basics of Jung's Typology.  Visit the Archetypal Typology page of this website to read my review of John Gianinni's book, Compass of the Soul and hear some of my reflections on this fascinating exploration of fundamental human differences.
  

Fall 2008
The Anima in Film is the title of a lecture series I gave at the Jung Institute on Wednesdays, September 24, 2008, October 1, 2008, and October 22, 2008.  The anima is the feminine archetype of life, critical in our patriarchal society to the emotional well being of women and men alike.  The anima is hard to describe theoretically, but the art of film communicates her reality especially well.  The first lecture explored The Anima in Fantasy Films like Star Wars and Steven Speilberg's Hook,Peter Jackson's King Kong and more recent films like Pan's Labyrinth and Bridge to Terabithia as converying the imaginative, fantasy aspects of the anima.  The second lecture explored The Anima in "Everyday" Life in films such as Little Miss Sunshine, The Sisterhood of the Travleing Pants, Antwone Fisher, Juno, and Knocked Up.  Set in real life these films poignantly express how the life energy of the anima is awakened and developed in our daily lives. The third lecture explored in depth the film Lars and the Real Girl, which depicts the emergence of the anima in a very introverted young man and the special attitudes required of those in relationship to this man so that she can come to life in him.  Visit the Jung Institute website or call (310) 556-1193 for further public program information.  (These lectures are available on CD at the Jung Institute's Bookstore and Library.)
 
On Saturday, September 20, 2008 I participated in a Clinical Supervision Seminar held at Antioch University and sponsored by the Los Angeles County Psychological Association.  The program was titled "Live Supervision of a Psychotherapy Case from Four Theoretical Perspectives and was moderated by a psychoanalyst and featured supervision from four theoretical positions: Congnitive Behavioral Therapy, Intersubjective Systems Theory, Narrative Therapy, and Jungian Analysis (my contribution).  You can obtain further information about future programs by the LACPA by calling (818) 905-0410 or emailing them at lacpsych@aol.com.
If December I gave a series of three lectures on the Gospel Birth Narratives at The Church of the Epiphany in Oak Park, California as part of their advent program.  We explored the origins of these narratives, why there are only two in the four Gospels, and looked in depth at the divergent accounts in Matthew and Luke for their symbolic meaning.  The Church of the Epiphany has year round programs.  Their website is: thechurchoftheepiphany.org.
Spring 2008
In the spring of 2008 I participated in two lectures series: an introductory series for the general public on C. G. Jung's psychology (my lecture was on Jung's typology), and a Clinical Dialogues Series for licensed professionals around the theme of Narcissism.  I offered the opening lecture, which reviewed the psychology of narcissism through major Jungian contributors, a review of the myth of Narcissus and Echo, and the central Jungian archetypes of shadow, anima/animus, and the Self.
I also co-taught a class on transference and countertransference with my wife, Tia, who is also a Jungian analyst, as part of the Institute's series for professionals--Analytical Psychology: Theory and Practice.
My spring teaching ended with a class for candidates in the analyst training program on myth and fairytales.
 
Fall 2007 I offered four lectures on the life of J.R.R. Tolkien, and his major worksThe Hobbit, and The Lord of the Rings.  (These lectures are available on CD through the Institute's bookstore.)
Further Details

In the past I have also taught  at Pacifica Graduate Institute as an Adjunct Faculty member, specifically a class for M.A. Counseling Psychology students on Myth, Literature, and Religious Studies.
 
 
Past Presentations
Course Offerings for Candidates in the Analyst Training Program at the C. G. Jung Institute of Los Angeles

         Fairytale, Myth, and Amplification

         Jung's Typology

         Jung and Gnosticism

         Dream Interpretation

         Jungian Perspectives on the Treatment of Narcissistic Wounding
         The Exodus Myth and the Modern Psyche
         The Golden Ass of Apuleius

         Child Sacrifice in Ancient and Modern Times
 

Course Offerings for the Institute's Analytical Psychology: Theory and Practice Professional Study Program for licensed professionals

  
          Jung's Typology
          Transference and Counter Transference
          Dreams
          The Archetypes of the Collective Unconscious
          Fairytale and Myth in Clinical Practice

Graduate School Course

          Myth, Literature and Religious Studies

Public Lectures in Los Angeles and Other Settings
         War and the Soul: Jungian Perspectives on PTSD
         Harry Potter, Horcruxes, and the Deathly Hallows
         Jung and the Call of the Wild
         Jung's Red Book and Psychological Types
         A Journey to Middle Earth: J. R. R. Tolkien, The Hobbit, and The Lord of the Rings (four    meetings)
         The King Kong Myth
         Jung’s Typology

         Jungian Approaches to the Psychology of Narcissism
         The Religious Function of the Psyche
         Fairytale and Myth in Film (numerous versions)
         Puer and Senex Archetypes
         Jungian Perspective on the Psychology of Perversions
         The Perversion of Relationship
          The Sexual Abuse Crisis in the Catholic Church

          Fairy Tales of Yesterday and Today
          The Anima in Film
          The Anima in Modern Culture and the Development of the Personality
          The Hero Archetype in Popular Culture (Zorro, Batman, Spiderman, et al)
          Processing National Trauma (lecture given after 9/11)
          Psychic Eruptions (lecture given after
          Country Music and the Psyche
          Relationship and Transcendence in the Music of Bruce Springsteen
          Sports and the Psyche